10 Killer Whales, or Orca Whales, Facts

Orca breaching
Killer Whale breaching photo by NOAA

10 Killer Whales or Orca Whales Facts:

1. Orca Whales are found in all the world’s oceans.

2. Orcas are apex predators and lack any natural predators.

3. Most males never leave their mothers.

4. Orcas have culture since their hunting techniques and vocalizations are passed down generations.

5. Killer Whales generate 3 types of sounds: clicks, whistles, and pulsed calls.

6. Each pod has its own dialect of calls (that only they use).

7. Orcas and pilot whales are the only non-human species in which females undergo menopause (around age 40 years) and live decades after.

8. There may be up to 4 generations of Orcas in a traveling group.

9. Orcas have the 2nd heaviest brain among marine mammals (sperm whales have the heaviest brain)

10. A female Orca gives birth to 1 calf every five years, and she averages 5 calves per lifetime.

Also see: The 200-Year-Old Bowhead Whale: The Oldest Mammal on Earth

10 Cool Facts About Narwhals

8 Surprising Facts about Orcas from Treehugger

10 Interesting Octopus Facts

10 Terrific Facts about Octopuses
10 Interesting Octopus Facts photo by: Cherilyn Chin

10 Interesting Octopus Facts

1. The preferred plural of “Octopus” is “Octopuses” by cephalopod and octopus lovers.

2. Octopuses are considered the earth’s most intelligent invertebrate. They are also very dexterous, and can be taught to unscrew the lid to a jar to get food inside! (I’ve actually done it!)

3. Due to having no bones and being an invertebrate, a Giant Pacific Octopus can fit through a 2 inch hole (which is the size of its beak or mouth).

4. Octopuses are masters of camouflage-not only can they match the pattern of the background they are on, but they can change texture too (Amazing octopus camouflage video here).

5. Octopuses have 3 hearts and blue-green blood.

6. A octopus not only feels with the suckers on its 8 arms, but it also tastes with its suckers too!

7. An octopus’ 8 arms move independently of its brain.

8. Most species of octopus are nocturnal (sleep during day, active at night) but some species like the Day Octopus (Octopus cyanea) are awake during the day.

9. The largest octopus on record was a Giant Pacific Octopus that weighed 600 pounds (272 kg) and arm-to-arm span was 30 foot wide (9m).

10. There are 300 species of octopuses ocean-wide.

For more on the octopuses’ cousins, the cephalopods see:
Meet Shelley the Chambered Nautilus

Vampire Squid: I’m No Vampire, I’m Not Even a Squid!

First Video Filmed of a Giant Squid in the Ocean

10 Jellyfish Facts for Kids

Jellyfish facts largest & smallest
Lion's Mane Jellyfish: the largest jelly in the ocean

10 Jellyfish Facts for Kids

1. A jellyfish is not a fish at all, it is an
invertebrate (animal without a backbone).

2. Invertebrates make up 95% of all animals on earth.

3. A jelly is made up of approximately 95% water.

4. A jelly does not have a brain, eyes, bones, teeth, or blood.

5. A jelly reproduces by making clones of itself (exact copies of itself) so it technically never dies.

6. There are 2 main stages to a jelly’s life cycle, the sessile (stuck to a surface) polyp, and the free-swimming medusa (what you think of as a jelly).

7. The largest jelly ever found was a Lion’s Mane Jelly with a diameter of 7 feet 6 inches (2.29m) and its tentacles trailed 120 feet behind it!

8. The smallest jelly is the Irukandji jelly which is only 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

9. Jellies are found in all the world’s oceans.

And the last jellyfish fact for kids is:

10. A box jelly (sea wasp) sting can kill you within 2-3 minutes.

10 Facts About the Lion’s Mane Jellyfish
10 Jellyfish Facts for Kids and Jelly Enthusiasts