Ocean of Hope

10 Interesting Octopus Facts

10 Terrific Facts about Octopuses
10 Interesting Octopus Facts photo by: Cherilyn Chin

10 Interesting Octopus Facts

1. The preferred plural of “Octopus” is “Octopuses” by cephalopod and octopus lovers.

2. Octopuses are considered the earth’s most intelligent invertebrate. They are also very dexterous, and can be taught to unscrew the lid to a jar to get food inside! (I’ve actually done it!)

3. Due to having no bones and being an invertebrate, a Giant Pacific Octopus can fit through a 2 inch hole (which is the size of its beak or mouth).

4. Octopuses are masters of camouflage-not only can they match the pattern of the background they are on, but they can change texture too (Amazing octopus camouflage video here).

5. Octopuses have 3 hearts and blue-green blood.

6. A octopus not only feels with the suckers on its 8 arms, but it also tastes with its suckers too!

7. An octopus’ 8 arms move independently of its brain.

8. Most species of octopus are nocturnal (sleep during day, active at night) but some species like the Day Octopus (Octopus cyanea) are awake during the day.

9. The largest octopus on record was a Giant Pacific Octopus that weighed 600 pounds (272 kg) and arm-to-arm span was 30 foot wide (9m).

10. There are 300 species of octopuses ocean-wide.

For more on the octopuses’ cousins, the cephalopods see:
Meet Shelley the Chambered Nautilus

Vampire Squid: I’m No Vampire, I’m Not Even a Squid!

First Video Filmed of a Giant Squid in the Ocean

10 Jellyfish Facts for Kids

Jellyfish facts largest & smallest
Lion's Mane Jellyfish: the largest jelly in the ocean

10 Jellyfish Facts for Kids

1. A jellyfish is not a fish at all, it is an
invertebrate (animal without a backbone).

2. Invertebrates make up 95% of all animals on earth.

3. A jelly is made up of approximately 95% water.

4. A jelly does not have a brain, eyes, bones, teeth, or blood.

5. A jelly reproduces by making clones of itself (exact copies of itself) so it technically never dies.

6. There are 2 main stages to a jelly’s life cycle, the sessile (stuck to a surface) polyp, and the free-swimming medusa (what you think of as a jelly).

7. The largest jelly ever found was a Lion’s Mane Jelly with a diameter of 7 feet 6 inches (2.29m) and its tentacles trailed 120 feet behind it!

8. The smallest jelly is the Irukandji jelly which is only 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

9. Jellies are found in all the world’s oceans.

And the last jellyfish fact for kids is:

10. A box jelly (sea wasp) sting can kill you within 2-3 minutes.

10 Facts About the Lion’s Mane Jellyfish
10 Jellyfish Facts for Kids and Jelly Enthusiasts

10 Amazing Sea Otter Facts

sea otter facts
Tagged Sea Otter: photo by Cherilyn Chin

Here are 10 Amazing Sea Otter Facts:

1. Sea Otters are one of the few animals that use tools. They mainly use rocks, but have been seen using glass soda bottles and cement blocks.

2. Newborn pups cannot sink or dive.

3. Sea Otters have built in pockets under their arms.

4. A group of Sea Otters resting together is called a raft.

5. Sea Otters are the only marine mammal without a layer of blubber (fat).

6. Sea Otters’ fur has 10x # of hairs per square inch than we have on our entire head. (humans 100,000; otters 1,000,000)

7. Sea Otters’ teeth are strong enough to bite through the spines of a sea urchin, or crunch a clam shell open.

8. Wild adult Sea Otters eat 25% or more of their body weight a day, or more than 12 pounds of seafood. A 150 lb human would need to eat 37 lbs of food a day!

9. Sea Otters’ diets can consist of: crabs, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, sea urchins, octopus, squid, snails, sea stars, and fat innkeeper worms.

And the last sea otter fact is:

10. Sea Otters’ only marine predators are humans, great white sharks, and killer whales.

Click here for “10 More Amazing Facts About Sea Otters”

Facts compiled from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s book, Sea Otters by Marianne Riedman

For more information on Sea Otters see my previous post on Joy and Toola, Surrogate Sea Otter Moms Extraordinaire
and My Unforgettable Moment with Mae, the Sea Otter Mom at the Monterey Bay Aquarium

Also visit:
Sea Otter Awareness Week
Twitter: #seaotterweek
Monterey Bay Aquarium’s
Sea Otter Research and Conservation Program (SORAC)

Friends of the Sea Otter
Seaotters.com
Olive the Oiled Otter Facebook Page

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